Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /homepages/14/d571965057/htdocs/Panpodium2017/wp-content/themes/gonzo/single.php on line 52

Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /homepages/14/d571965057/htdocs/Panpodium2017/wp-content/themes/gonzo/single.php on line 53

Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /homepages/14/d571965057/htdocs/Panpodium2017/wp-content/themes/gonzo/single.php on line 54

Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /homepages/14/d571965057/htdocs/Panpodium2017/wp-content/themes/gonzo/single.php on line 55

Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /homepages/14/d571965057/htdocs/Panpodium2017/wp-content/themes/gonzo/single.php on line 56

Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /homepages/14/d571965057/htdocs/Panpodium2017/wp-content/themes/gonzo/single.php on line 57

Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /homepages/14/d571965057/htdocs/Panpodium2017/wp-content/themes/gonzo/single.php on line 58
Jamaica

Published on July 21st, 2016 | by The Gleaner

0

A Pleasant Evening Of ‘Rhapsody In Steel’

When short, hand-held sticks gently hit specific spots in a timely manner, the beautiful sound that emanated from the mainly half pans, with a few full-sized ones, was mesmerising. Despite the absence of vocals – except for a shout here and there for dynamism – the words of the songs being played seemed to float from the well-arranged patterns brought to life by the choreographed, dexterous movements of each musician.

So it was on Sunday that the Manning’s Hill Road-based church, St John The Evangelist, had the sixth staging of their fundraising steel band concert at the Karram Speid Auditorium. Aptly, it was called ‘Rhapsody in Steel: A Musical Feast’. There was no denying that it was, indeed, a ‘pan’ concert. From the opening item, Jamaica’s National Anthem, to more than three quarters of the programme, it was a steady dose of favourites. Two bands, The Bethel Steel Orchestra and The UWI Panoridim Steel Orchestra, were entrusted with the responsibility of keeping the audience fully engaged.

On paper, the format of the programme seemed mundane, the bands were to alternate their performances. But aided by some witty remarks from MC Aggrey Irons, mundane faded fast. It was a ‘clash’ between musical friends, although Irons dubbed it war. The Bethel players opened with Evad Campbell’s arrangement of Caribbean Medleyand songs by Donnie McClurkin. On the conclusion of the Bethel players’ first set, the Panoridims, placed stage left, replied with Third World’s Try Jah Love. It was arranged by Allison Morris. They immediately followed with the first of four of Samantha Williams’ arrangements,Uptown Funk by Mark Ronson featuring Bruno Mars. This was just what the younger members of the audience wanted, and they easily provided the vocals.

Read More


About the Author



Comments are closed.

Back to Top ↑